Are you ready to change lives through diabetes education? The number of individuals affected with prediabetes and diabetes in the United States is staggering, and continues to grow. Our certificate program in Diabetes Essentials is an excellent opportunity to educate yourself, develop practical skills, and empower our community with knowledge of the debilitating effects of the condition. The program offers critical information such as: the causes of diabetes, lifestyle changes that can prevent or minimize the disease, as well as resources for those living with diabetes.

 

Advance your career in diabetes education and care

Educate and care for your community with the Diabetes Essential Certificate programs. Benerd College offers two pathways: Diabetes Essentials for Clinicians, and Diabetes Essentials for Non-Clinicians. Both paths offer excellent courses and can help to advance your career and skills in providing diabetes education and care to those you serve. Instructors are local, national and international experts in the field.

Diabetes Essentials for Clinicians

Students will learn current and comprehensive practice applications of diabetes care and education for people with type 1 and 2 (both in children and adults). They will also be educated on prediabetes, and gestational diabetes from renowned experts and thought leaders. Students in the program will start with an illustrated review of pathophysiology and landmark studies in order to understand the evidence-based treatment modalities. 

 

Diabetes Essentials Cerificate

Program Overview

Students will learn current and comprehensive practice applications of diabetes care and education for people with type 1 and 2 (both in children and adults). They will also be educated on prediabetes, and gestational diabetes from renowned experts and thought leaders. Students in the program will start with an illustrated review of pathophysiology and landmark studies in order to understand the evidence-based treatment modalities. Upon completion of the program, students will have improved skills in delivering effective, patient-centered diabetes education and care that focuses on strategies to promote wellness through behavior change and reduce barriers for vulnerable populations. Students will gain insights about the lived experience from people with diabetes. Student outcomes include the ability to explain pharmacological options to manage glucose, blood pressure and lipids. Students will also explore basic and advanced technologies used to decrease the burden of living with diabetes while also improving outcomes.

Complete course length is 100 hours. Since this course is self-paced, students are expected to budget an average of two hours per week to complete the entire program within a year of enrollment. May complete sooner based on the availability of time to dedicate to the course. Students may also complete a portion of the course for partial credits within a course without achieving the certificate.

The certificate consists of five courses priced at $299 individually, or $995 for all five.

Commercial Support: This program will use support from the Abbott Fund for the purpose of providing scholarships.

Foundations of Diabetes Care

After completing the Foundations course, students will explain how landmark trials drive practice in preventing possible complications via the “legacy effect.” This will demonstrate the impact this has on the person with diabetes through care delivery. Based on recent science, students will learn to identify the target numbers trifecta (glucose/A1C, blood pressure, lipids) to promote outcomes. They will be expected to measure the effectiveness of prevention and treatment strategies of diabetes and its related conditions. This foundations course will create an understanding of the benefits of a weight-inclusive approach in diabetes management. Students are expected to demonstrate competence in using person-first, strengths-based, empowering language to enhance communication and enhance motivation, health, and well-being of people with diabetes.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain how landmark diabetes trials drive practice in preventing possible complications via the “legacy effect: and the impact that has on the person living with diabetes.
  2. Identify the target levels of glucose and A1C, blood pressure, and lipids to achieve with 80% accuracy by referring to the American Diabetes Association Standards of Care to promote diabetes outcomes.
  3. Contrast at least 1 pro and 1 con of the weight-reduction strategies used with the Diabetes Prevention Program, bariatric surgery, and DiRECT trial to prevent type 2 diabetes or achieve remission.
  4. Demonstrate competence in using person-first, strengths-based, empowering language to enhance communication, motivation, and well-being of a person with diabetes, as applied to a case study.

Inclusive Care & Special Populations

The Inclusive Care & Special Populations course will allow students to distinguish at least five common barriers faced by vulnerable populations with diabetes and how clinical interventions mitigate these challenges and improve outcomes. Students will analyze how social determinants of health impact people with diabetes and differentiate treatment approaches for type 1 and 2 in youth. This includes what to teach families of newly diagnosed children and hospital guidelines for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Students will be able to name the 2 main differences in nutrition for pregnant women with diabetes and explain how low health literacy and food insecurity worsen outcomes. Students will also review the populations hit hardest by diabetes and how they can improve their experience with the healthcare system and their wellness.

Learning Objectives

  1. Analyze 1 social determinant of health’s impact on diabetes (which may include a person with limited health literacy, food insecurity, or disability), and what could be done to help minimize that barrier.
  2. Contrast at least 3 unique ways to provide inclusive care that address the cultural norms of 3 distinct special populations with diabetes.
  3. Assess with 80% accuracy which statements are true about hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis.
  4. Classify the approach to individualization of glycemic targets (stringent vs. A1C of 7% vs. less stringent) given patient and disease factors, risk for hypoglycemia, disease duration, life expectancy, comorbidities, patient preference, and support system.
  5. Create a micro-presentation detailing the one inclusive care approach that is believed to be most effective in removing barriers from one special population in the community in which the student resides.

Pharmacotherapy

The Pharmacotherapy course will allow students to differentiate the major medication classifications used for diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia and their pathophysiologic target. Using case scenarios, students will identify strategies to optimize insulin, including basal, prandial, and correctional. The course will review at least 5 of the latest diabetes oral, inhalable, and injectable medications. The course also explains safety considerations of common classifications of medications used for hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and sexual dysfunction. Students will be able to name at least 1 anti-obesity medication used for type 2 diabetes management and remission and understand common dietary supplements used for diabetes and related conditions that many people take.

Learning Objectives

  1. Differentiate the major medication classifications and their pathophysiologic target used for diabetes and related conditions, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), obesity, and sexual dysfunction.
  2. Distinguish which pharmacotherapeutic agent to use for diabetes and its related conditions given a multitude of case studies.
  3. Identify strategies to optimize basal, prandial and correctional insulin via case scenarios.
  4. Compare the possible adverse effects of both common and newer diabetes medication classifications.
  5. Explain how newer diabetes medication classifications (SGLT2i and GLP1-RA) offer improved cardiorenal outcomes, yet because of racial disparities, those who would benefit the most are least likely to get them.
  6. Analyze the effectiveness of LDL and triglyceride-lowering agents.
  7. Interpret the possible benefit of using supplements for diabetes and its related conditions.
  8. Create a micro-presentation detailing the one new pharmacotherapeutic approach the student would utilize for one person with diabetes (whether actual or fictitious) that differs from the approach that would have been taken prior to completing this course.

Diabetes Technology

Diabetes Technology will identify types of diabetes technology used, from basic to continuous glucose monitoring and insulin pens and pumps, including “looping” or artificial pancreas systems. In this course, students will prepare an argument “for” and “against” using a particular diabetes device based on who would and would not be an ideal candidate for that technology. Then, students will formulate strategies to maximize engagement with diabetes technology. This is done by selecting, procuring, and educating on the right devices when given 3 case studies. Students will also learn about the latest diabetes wellness apps and how telehealth, text messages, and social media initiatives increase user engagement and self-care.

Learning Objectives

  1. Summarize the evolution of diabetes technology and types currently used, from basics to advanced tools including continuous glucose monitoring(CGM)to insulin pen and pumps, including “looping” or artificial pancreas systems.
  2. Prepare an argument for and against using a particular diabetes device in terms of who would and would not be an ideal candidate for that technology.
  3. Interpret the various metrics within aCGM’sambulatory glucose profile (AGP) report.
  4. Identify the steps needed for a child or an adult with diabetes to start on an insulin pump.
  5. Identify the components required to integrate diabetes technology into a telehealth visit.
  6. Perform a diabetes monitoring experience using low-or high-tech options.
  7. Compare diabetes technology options and troubleshooting diabetes technology issues.

Diabetes Education and Wellness

In the Diabetes Education and Wellness course, students will compare nutrition and physical activity approaches and recommend which style might be best. This course is designed for students to understand several different models for inpatient diabetes education and review several case studies on caring for people hospitalized with hyper or hypoglycemia. Students will select evidence-based approaches to facilitate behavior change in persons living with diabetes. Students will also evaluate the link between the emotional side of diabetes and self-care behavior. Students will be expected to describe how many hours of aerobic exercise can increase insulin sensitivity and what happens to those improvements in insulin action during overeating. Finally, students will learn how to communicate with encouraging feedback to a person living with diabetes.

Learning Objectives

  1. Distinguish the elements required to make a behavior change goal realistic.
  2. Identify strategies to improve glucose management and diabetes education in hospital settings.
  3. Assess the difference between diabetes distress and depression.
  4. Facilitate healthy coping skills in a person who is experiencing the many challenges of living with diabetes.
  5. Compare several nutrition and physical activity approaches and recommend which style might be best suited given case studies.
  6. Develop assessment questions that address each of theAADE7 Self-Care Behaviors™ to elicit state of wellness type responses.
  7. Explain the main lifestyle components of the national Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and provide a basic critique of its curriculum.
  8. Identify and apply the path to getting the CDCES and/or BC-ADM credentials.
  9. Demonstrate appropriate participatory teaching methods in delivery of education.

Method of Participation/ Instruction for Obtaining Credit

Participants should complete all assignments and tasks in the Canvas Platform using access information provided by the University of the Pacific, Benerd College. Upon completing engagement with the content and passing multiple-choice test questions, completion will automatically be logged. 

You must receive a score of 80% or better on the final post-test to earn a certificate. You will have a maximum of 3 attempts to successfully complete the post-test. Certificates will be accessible within 30 days of completion, and instructions for accessing CME and NASW certificates is provided below. Certificates for CPE credit claimants will be available in CPE Monitor.

To Access and/or Manage your Certificate(s) of Credit or Transcript(s):

  1. Visit ww2.highmarksce.com/ucsf/ to login.

If you have never logged in before:

A. Type in your email address as your username

B. Click the “Get It Now” link just below the green login button.

C. Use the temporary link sent to your email to access the system

D. Update/save your profile information.

E. Once all your information is verified, you will be taken to your “Dashboard".

  1. If you do not see Tiles, click on the word “Dashboard” on the left side of your screen, just below the blue banner.
  2. On the Credits tile, click the Online Courses link. It opens a page where you can print certificates.

Accreditation

ACCMEThis activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of UCSF and University of the Pacific’s Benerd College UCSF is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Nurses: For the purpose of recertification, the American Nurses Credentialing Center accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ issued by organizations accredited by the ACCME. For the purpose of relicensure, the California Board of Registered Nursing accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™(report up to20.00 hours of credit and list "CME Category 1" as the provider number).

Nurse Practitioners: For the purposes of recertification, AANPCB accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) TM issued by organizations accredited by ACCME as an equivalent number of hours of participation

Registered Dietitians: The Commission on Dietetic Registration accepts as continuing professional education those courses that meet the standard of relevance to Dietetic practice and have been approved for AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

Psychologists: This educational activity is recognized by the California Board of Psychology as meeting the continuing education requirements toward license renewal for California psychologists. Psychologists are responsible for reporting their own attendance to the California Board of Psychology. Psychologists from other states should check with their respective licensing boards.

Physician Assistants: PAs may claim a maximum of 20.00 Category 1 credit(s) for completing this activity. NCCPA accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society. AAPA accepts category 1 credit from AOACCME, Prescribed credit from AAFP, and AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by the ACCME.

CME credit will be available starting July 26, 2021

Expires July 25, 2024.

NASWSocial Workers: This Program is approved by the National Association of Social Workers. NASW Provider Approval Number: 886748651-1934

Exclusions: This credit is not valid in the following states: · New Jersey · New York · North Carolina · West Virginia

NASW credit will be available starting September 22, 2021 Expires September 30, 2022. (Renewal of credit will be annual through September of 2023, so learners should complete their current course before September.) Continuation of credit for future years is pending through September 2024.

ACPEPharmacists: The University of California, San Francisco, School of Pharmacy is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

CPE credit will be available starting (initial release date) Oct. 1, 2021

Expires (planned expiration date): May 31, 2024

Designation

UCSF has approved this program for CME credit: UCSF designates this live activity for a maximum of 100.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This program has been approved by the NASW for 100.00 Continuing Education Units (CEUs).

UCSF approved all courses in this program for CPE credit:

Foundations Course: This application-based activity is approved for 20.00 contact hours (2.00 CEUs) under the ACPE Universal Activity Number 0005-9999-21-011-H01-P.

Inclusive Care & Special Populations Course: This application-based activity is approved for 20.00 contact hours (2.00 CEUs) under the ACPE Universal Activity Number 0005-9999-21-012-H01-P.

Pharmacotherapy Course: This application-based activity is approved for 20.00 contact hours (2.00 CEUs) under the ACPE Universal Activity Number 0005-9999-21-013-H01-P.

Diabetes Technology Course: This application-based activity is approved for 20.00 contact hours (2.00 CEUs) under the ACPE Universal Activity Number 0005-9999-21-014-H01-P.

Diabetes Education & Wellness Course: This application-based activity is approved for 20.00 contact hours (2.00 CEUs) under the ACPE Universal Activity Number 0005-9999-21-015-H01-P.

Disclosure

This UCSF CME activity was planned and developed to uphold academic standards to ensure balance, independence, objectivity, and scientific rigor; adhere to requirements to protect health information under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA); and include a mechanism to inform learners when unapproved or unlabeled uses of therapeutic products or agents are discussed or referenced.

All individuals in a position to control content have disclosed.

The planner of this program, Theresa Garnero, APRN, BC-ADM, MSN, CDCES, has stated she has no relationships to disclose.

Each presenter has included a dedicated disclosure slide to inform learners of their presence or absence of relationships with ineligible companies, prior to the discussion of content.

Supplemental Material:

Cultural and Linguistic Competency Resources
CLC Info and Resources

UC Online Privacy Policy
http://meded.ucsf.edu/cme/privacy-policy

Please note: An Adobe Acrobat reader is required to view or print portable document formats (pdf).

To inquire about course certifications for credit, please contact the UCSF Office of Continuing Medical Education using the information below.

UCSF School of Medicine
Office of Continuing Medical Education
Box 0742
490 Illinois St., Floor 8
San Francisco, CA  94143

info@ocme.ucsf.edu
Phone: 415.476.4251 • Fax: 415.476.0318

Diabetes Essentials for Non-Clinicians
Diabetes Essentials for Non-Clinicians

The certificate in Diabetes Essentials for Non-Clinicians is designed to give students a foundational understanding of diabetes. Through the study of the American Diabetes Association guidelines, the Diabetes Essentials for Non-Clinicians Certificate will help students address barriers to diabetes management in various settings: primary care clinic, workplace, school and home.

The certificate can be obtained by completing all three classes in order over six weeks. It is a fully online program. Upon completion of all three courses, students will be awarded a Certificate of Completion from University of the Pacific.

Program Description

Diabetes paraprofessionals1 are in a prime position to help improve patients’ behaviors related to prediabetes, diabetes, and the risk for its associated conditions. This Diabetes Essentials for Non-Clinicians Certificate program follows national guidelines in providing the paraprofessional with the knowledge, guidance, and resources necessary for facilitating culturally competent care with diabetes prevention and diabetes management within their scope of practice. First, students will learn about the American Diabetes Association’s Standards of Care. Then, through interactive assignments, apply this knowledge to address barriers to diabetes self-care behaviors (such as healthy eating, being active, monitoring, and taking medications) that face several minority populations. Students will receive a Certificate of Completion upon completing all three courses.

1 Diabetes paraprofessionals have various roles in facilitating self-care. They may include lay health workers, community health workers, peer counselors, health navigators, coaches, assistive school personnel, dental hygienists, certified nursing assistants, medical assistants, dietetic technicians, registered pharmacy technicians, physical therapy assistants, and licensed physicians, vocational nurses. Course length is 30 hours. Since this course is self-paced, students are expected to budget an average of 2 hours per week to complete the entire program within 4 months of enrollment.

The certificate consists of three courses priced at $99 individually, or $249 for all three.

UDBM 110 — Introduction to Diabetes Basics

Course Description: Upon completion of this first course, Introduction to Diabetes Basics, the student will be able to describe clinical practice guidelines for the prevention and management of diabetes and what part their role plays in addressing these standards of care. This includes learning about the basic types of diabetes, how to minimize modifiable risk factors and possible complications, and communication strategies to foster patient advocacy, empowerment, and resolve team conflict. Students will also learn how to educate about the A1C, blood pressure, and cholesterol, the benefits of a weight-inclusive approach in diabetes management, and advocate for the needs of individuals with diabetes.

UDBM 120 — Facilitating Self-Care Behaviors

Course Description: Upon completion of this second course, Facilitating Self-Care, the student will demonstrate familiarity with core self-care behaviors1 necessary for diabetes wellness (such as healthy eating, being active, healthy coping, and problem-solving situations like hypoglycemia). This includes providing diabetes-related information consistent with the care team, understanding how common medications, injectables, and supplements work to manage diabetes and related conditions, describing how to prepare the technology for an in-person or telehealth visit, setting realistic goals, and referring to local resources.

  1. Association of Diabetes Care and Education Specialists 7 Self-Care Behaviors TM

UDBM 130 — Cultural Competency in Diabetes Care

Course Description: Upon completion of this third course, Cultural Competency in Diabetes Care, the student will demonstrate diabetes support and care from youth through elderly populations in a culturally competent manner. In addition, the student will learn how to remove barriers to common health equity disparities experienced in several minority populations. This includes reviewing foods specific to several cultures, learning about how food insecurity and social determinants of health impact diverse communities with diabetes and promoting health in a manner that matches the individual's unique needs.

Abbott Fund Scholars Opportunity

If you are currently employed or seeking employment in health care, a community-based organization, education, or an organization that is providing services to Stockton or San Joaquin County residents living with diabetes, you may be eligible to receive a scholarship. Applicants whose organizations provide services to priority neighborhoods in Stockton or San Joaquin County are highly encouraged to apply. The scholarship will cover 100% of tuition, requiring students to complete all courses in the specific track for which they've applied (all 3 courses for the Non-Clinical track, or all 5 courses for the Clinical track).

Abbot Scholars Opportunity

Testimonials

Hear what our alumni have to say about the courses.

Lisa, FNP-BC

Diabetes Essentials for Clinicians

"Nutrition lectures were helpful too because they gave me better ways to communicate with patients. In my practice, I have tried to stay away from calling people “diabetic” as there are some who find the term offensive and have yelled at my staff that they do not like labels. The lectures made me even more mindful of how to talk to patients in a less biased way, and to not focus so much on weight loss and to consider the other factors affecting and causing diabetes. I have adjusted my teachings to not focus too much on weight loss and more on overall lifestyle changes and interventions."

Shanice, Administration Clerk

Diabetes Essentials for Non-Clinicians

"I loved the course! The no pressure of deadlines and going at your own pace was wonderful for this single working mother of four. The videos/materials were easy to comprehend. I really enjoying learning the basics of diabetes such as the causes, diet, management, and the everyday struggles of dealing with the disease. My favorite was learning about the different cultures and becoming more understanding, compassionate, and empathetic towards people trying to manage diabetes."

Annie Thor, Certified Nurse Midwife

Annie, Certified Nurse Midwife

Diabetes Essentials for Clinicians

"I work as a Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) and see many patients with a history of gestational diabetes (GDM) and in the community I serve, many of them tend to get T2D later on in life. After learning from these lectures, I plan to change my practice and offer a discussion of Metformin for prevention and to prolong getting the diagnosis of diabetes. Besides offering Metformin, I plan to discuss lifestyle changes and advise that diabetes should be screened more often."

Sarah, Nurse Practitioner

Diabetes Essentials for Clinicians

"I want to express my appreciation for this Foundations module! The behavioral side of diabetes, the stigma and the lived experience is SO important. Please extend my deepest gratitude to the folks on the panel for being so candid about their experience with diabetes."

Sarah, Nurse Practitioner
Contact Us

Theresa Garnero, Assistant Clinical Professor and Director of Diabetes Management Certificate Programs